Viser indlæg med etiketten rent-seeking. Vis alle indlæg
Viser indlæg med etiketten rent-seeking. Vis alle indlæg

3.2.10

Det klima-industrielle kompleks II

Jeg afholder mig generelt fra at skrive om klima-debatten--ikke mindst fordi det ikke er dér, min faglige styrke, endsige viden, ligger.  Men som også Lomborg har påpeget: Særinteressegrupper skal altid holdes under opsyn, og afsløringerne af urent trav i.f.m. forskning, der skal godtgøre, at 1) der foregår global opvarmning, og 2) den er menneskeskabt, burde give anledning til en vis forundring og forargelse.

21.5.09

Det klima-industrielle kompleks

Min gamle kollega, fagfælle og studiekammerat, Bjørn Lomborg, har en tankevækkende kronik i Wall Street Journal om det, der kan kaldes det "klima-industrielle kompleks": Snævre særinteresser med en privatøkonomisk interesse i at ekspandere miljøreguleringen og derfor i at overdimensionere miljørpoblemerne:

"This phenomenon will be on display at the World Business Summit on Climate Change in Copenhagen this weekend. The organizers -- the Copenhagen Climate Council -- hope to push political leaders into more drastic promises when they negotiate the Kyoto Protocol's replacement in December.

The opening keynote address is to be delivered by Al Gore, who actually represents all three groups: He is a politician, a campaigner and the chair of a green private-equity firm invested in products that a climate-scared world would buy.

Naturally, many CEOs are genuinely concerned about global warming. But many of the most vocal stand to profit from carbon regulations. The term used by economists for their behavior is "rent-seeking."

The world's largest wind-turbine manufacturer, Copenhagen Climate Council member Vestas, urges governments to invest heavily in the wind market. It sponsors CNN's "Climate in Peril" segment, increasing support for policies that would increase Vestas's earnings. A fellow council member, Mr. Gore's green investment firm Generation Investment Management, warns of a significant risk to the U.S. economy unless a price is quickly placed on carbon.

Even companies that are not heavily engaged in green business stand to gain. European energy companies made tens of billions of euros in the first years of the European Trading System when they received free carbon emission allocations. ...

U.S. companies and interest groups involved with climate change hired 2,430 lobbyists just last year, up 300% from five years ago. Fifty of the biggest U.S. electric utilities -- including Duke -- spent $51 million on lobbyists in just six months.

The massive transfer of wealth that many businesses seek is not necessarily good for the rest of the economy. Spain has been proclaimed a global example in providing financial aid to renewable energy companies to create green jobs. But research shows that each new job cost Spain 571,138 euros, with subsidies of more than one million euros required to create each new job in the uncompetitive wind industry. Moreover, the programs resulted in the destruction of nearly 110,000 jobs elsewhere in the economy, or 2.2 jobs for every job created."